Untitled
ledazblog:

First shot done of my film: Crocodile Tears. I did the animation, and a classmate did the background art.

Initial animation on a film project by a good artist worth checking out.

ledazblog:

First shot done of my film: Crocodile Tears. I did the animation, and a classmate did the background art.

Initial animation on a film project by a good artist worth checking out.

jenpenn:

Victor Bykov

Beautiful scenic art.

staceythinx:

Astonishingly beautiful astrophotography by Rogelio Bernal Andreo. Click on the images for locations.

Our beautiful & magical universe.

holygoddamnshitballs:

One teenager has been arrested and authorities are seeking another in connection with the beating death of an 88-year-old veteran of World War II. According to CNN, Delbert Belton was robbed, beaten and left for dead earlier this week by two teens outside the local lodge in Spokane, WA where he frequently played pool and socialized.

animationart:

The Wind Rises Trailer(w/Subtitles)-Hayao Miyazaki 

darkwolf80s:

Hahahaha!!! So that’s how this photographer was able to get his dog photos underwater!! Neat idea!

Man’s best friend.

scutter2:

estifi:

thexyaffair:

2013 is going to be an amazing year.

Here’s the schedule for this comet.

August and September 2013. The comet should become visible in August and September 2013 to observers at dark locations using small telescopes or possibly even binoculars.
October 2013. Comet ISON should become visible to the unaided eye, but only barely in the early part of the month. The comet will be sweeping in front of the constellation Leo then. It’ll pass first near Leo’s brightest star Regulus, then near the planet Mars. Maybe these brighter objects will help you find it that month. Meanwhile, the comet itself will be getting brighter during October.
November 2013. Comet ISON will continue to brighten throughout the month as it nears its late November perihelion (closest point to our sun). Plus ISON will pass very close to the bright star Spica and the planet Saturn, both in the constellation Virgo.  Its perihelion (closest point to our sun) on November 28 will be an exciting time. The comet will come within 800,000 miles (1.2 million km) of our sun’s surface. If all goes well, and the comet doesn’t break up (as comets sometimes do), the terrific heating Comet ISON will undergo when it’s closest to our parent star might turn the comet into a brilliant object. Some are predicting that ISON will become as bright as a full moon! That would make Comet ISON a daylight object, briefly. Remember, though, at perihelion, Comet ISON will appear close to the sun on the sky’s dome (only 4.4° north of the sun on November 28). Although the comet will be bright, you’ll need to look carefully to see it in the sun’s glare. Some expert help around this time might be called for, and we’ll announce comet-viewing parties as we hear about them.
December 2013. This may be the best month to see Comet ISON, assuming it has survived its close pass near the sun intact. The comet will be visible both in the evening sky after sunset and in the morning sky before sunrise. As ISON’s distance from the sun increases, it’ll grow dimmer. But, for a time, it should be as bright as our sky’s brightest planet, Venus, and it should have a long comet tail. People all over Earth will be able to see it, but it’ll be best seen from the Northern Hemisphere as 2013 draws to a close.
January 2014. Will ISON still be visible to the eye? Hopefully. And on January 8, 2014, the comet will lie only 2° from Polaris — the North Star.


If this doesn’t deserve a reblog I’m not sure what does.

scutter2:

estifi:

thexyaffair:

2013 is going to be an amazing year.

Here’s the schedule for this comet.

August and September 2013. The comet should become visible in August and September 2013 to observers at dark locations using small telescopes or possibly even binoculars.

October 2013. Comet ISON should become visible to the unaided eye, but only barely in the early part of the month. The comet will be sweeping in front of the constellation Leo then. It’ll pass first near Leo’s brightest star Regulus, then near the planet Mars. Maybe these brighter objects will help you find it that month. Meanwhile, the comet itself will be getting brighter during October.

November 2013. Comet ISON will continue to brighten throughout the month as it nears its late November perihelion (closest point to our sun). Plus ISON will pass very close to the bright star Spica and the planet Saturn, both in the constellation Virgo.  Its perihelion (closest point to our sun) on November 28 will be an exciting time. The comet will come within 800,000 miles (1.2 million km) of our sun’s surface. If all goes well, and the comet doesn’t break up (as comets sometimes do), the terrific heating Comet ISON will undergo when it’s closest to our parent star might turn the comet into a brilliant object. Some are predicting that ISON will become as bright as a full moon! That would make Comet ISON a daylight object, briefly. Remember, though, at perihelion, Comet ISON will appear close to the sun on the sky’s dome (only 4.4° north of the sun on November 28). Although the comet will be bright, you’ll need to look carefully to see it in the sun’s glare. Some expert help around this time might be called for, and we’ll announce comet-viewing parties as we hear about them.

December 2013. This may be the best month to see Comet ISON, assuming it has survived its close pass near the sun intact. The comet will be visible both in the evening sky after sunset and in the morning sky before sunrise. As ISON’s distance from the sun increases, it’ll grow dimmer. But, for a time, it should be as bright as our sky’s brightest planet, Venus, and it should have a long comet tail. People all over Earth will be able to see it, but it’ll be best seen from the Northern Hemisphere as 2013 draws to a close.

January 2014. Will ISON still be visible to the eye? Hopefully. And on January 8, 2014, the comet will lie only 2° from Polaris — the North Star.

If this doesn’t deserve a reblog I’m not sure what does.

multicolors:

benskid:

Know where you stand.

Wow

familiaralien:

hungrylikethewolfie:

thaddeusgrey:

yoccu:

ifightformyfriends:

sith-ari:

Leopard Seal tries to teach National Geographic photographer how to hunt.

Oh my god this is so adorable

“I think she thought the camera was my mouth, which is every photographer’s dream”

WARNING: includes a photo of a sort of mangled penguin so if you do not like looking at sort of mangled penguin be advised uwu

this is the best thing

I was literally just telling my sister about this.

The seal is like “Da fuck asshole, just eat the freakin’ bird!”

jakefogelnest:

I love you, Boston. 

jakefogelnest:

I love you, Boston.